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    (DCV) Dr. Cue Video - APA Lesson 20: Stroke Practice With Barrier Training!

    (About the author of the Billiard Gods books)

    HOBGlogo95-video

    Sometimes you need a "trick" to force you to do the right thing. If you've got problems with your stroke, here's a way to destroy the bad habit and build muscle memory for the good habit.

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    (S&D) Safety & Defense - Personalities: The Impatient Player

      (About the author)

      Safety Toolbox (Advanced)

      (This is today's bit of advice from the book Safety Toolbox.)

      A player with this personality type likes to get things done quickly. He specializes in “lightning analysis” that rarely is well thought out. His shooting style reflects his attitude. He won't have time to take time to get it right. He seems to wants to get the game over as quickly as possible. If you are a slow and deliberate player, you can get a first-hand example of the term “gnashing of teeth”. Continue reading

      (S&D) Safety & Defense - Personalities: The Angry Player

        (About the author)

        Safety Toolbox (Advanced)

        (This is today's bit of advice from the book Safety Toolbox.)

        This type of player is either constantly upset or looking for an opportunity to display his short temper. He is usually found in bar environments. To him, pool is intended to be an interruption in an otherwise bad day. Unfortunately he still carries his emotional baggage into the game. Continue reading

        (S&D) Safety & Defense - How to Use the Mindset Matrix

          (About the author)

          Safety Toolbox (Advanced)

          (This is today's bit of advice from the book Safety Toolbox.)

          Based on the table layout, you can usually reach an immediate decision whether to play an offensive shot or start figuring out defensive choices. If you can't quickly decide which intention to use, default to the defensive mindset.

          Applying the decision breakpoint

          The following considerations play a factor in your decisions. This can change depending on other factors. If the match is very important, you would crank up the numbers 5, 10, even 15% higher.

          • Against lesser players, go offensive with a lower percentage of success. For example, a 50% shot number and a 60% positioning number could be used to play offensive mindset. Anything less than these two numbers would apply the defensive mindset.
          • Against an equally skilled player, a 60% shot number and a 50% positioning number could default to the offensive mindset. If either number was smaller, go with the defensive mindset.
          • Against better players, a 70-80% shot number and a 65-70% positioning number could default to the offensive mindset. Less numbers would use the defensive mindset.

          Offensive matrix

          This is the mindset you are most familiar with using. Here is an overview of the process:

          1. Select the target ball to be pocketed. (If multiple balls (in 8 Ball), apply this procedure to each ball.)
          2. What are the chances of making the object ball? Be brutally honest. You are not doing yourself any favors by over-estimating.

          If acceptable, go to the next step.
          If not, consider a defensive shot.

          1. What are the chances of getting shape for the next ball in a pattern? (If multiple possibilities, consider shape for each.)

          If not feasible, consider a defensive shot.
          If acceptable, go to next step.

          1. Mentally plan an offensive pattern. When ready, proceed.

          At any time when you feel that the chances of success are less possible, consider the options in Two-way shots (on page 129 in the book).

          Defensive matrix

          The complexity of the game is maximized when considering defensive options. For that shot, you must evaluate the possibilities and consequences of dozens and hundreds of shooting choices. It does get easier the more experience you have in playing safeties.

          There is no basic procedure or process in deciding how to play a defensive shot. The decision is made mainly by evaluation of the different shots against a series of conditions. Here are bullet points that help:

          • Allow for your opponent’s skill level.
          • Allow for your skill level.
          • Does the table layout suggest ideas?
          • Consider possibilities that you have already practiced.
          • Reduce or eliminate billiard god luck (chaos).
          • Simple is always better.
          • Slower speeds are better, higher speeds can kill.
          • Any helper balls around?
          • Select large target areas. (It is easy to get a ball into a two-square diamond area, harder to get it a quarter diamond square.)
          • Work up in complexity from one-rail to two-rail to three-rail until you are beyond your ability to execute.
          • If confused, backtrack to the simpler or easier shots.

          Summary

          Given various circumstances, modify the numbers. The key to making this matrix a success is reality-based expectations. Smart choices keep the table under control. Careless choices reduce the chances of winning.

          Overestimating your competence is just plain being stupid. Fortunately, reality has a way of correcting such mental mistakes. You want your opponent to overestimate his skills. It doesn’t hurt to compliment him when he is successful on a lower percentage shot. They might help him decide to try more of the chancy situations.

          You may not lose because of one poor mindset decision, but you open the opportunity for billiard god luck (chaos) to enter your game. You want chaos to be common for your opponent, not for you. As long as you are calm and logical, the matrix increases your wins.

           

          (DCV) Dr. Cue Video - APA Lesson 19: Side (Lateral) Spin Practice

          (About the author of the Billiard Gods books)

          HOBGlogo95-video

          There are times when you need to put extreme side spin to make the cue ball dance around the table. Like all shots that have good outcomes, you need to practice this shot so that you can get predictable results.

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          (H&S) Hustles & Sharks - Nagger

            (About the Author)

            Learn how to Beat the Sharks

            Some people, for one reason or another, always want to intrude upon your playing pleasure by offering up little helpful reminders. Some players seem to have a “Mom” complex and love to assume that role – even at the pool table. A number of these are:

            • "Don't forget to chalk for every shot."
            • "Stay down on the shot."
            • "Always follow through."

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            (H&S) Hustles & Sharks - My Stick is Better

              (About the Author)

              Learn how to Beat the Sharks

              This is a much more focused effort than the Equipment shark. It is designed to compare the quality of your stick against the obviously superior cue stick of your opponent.

              At every good shot he makes, he brags up that it is the stick that makes it easy. At every bad shot you do, he blames your poor quality equipment for causing the problem. Continue reading