Tag Archives: hustler

(H&S) Hustles & Sharks - Lucky Me

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Learn how to Beat the Sharks

Every once in a while you face a hustler who uses this tactic to throw you off your game. It is designed to be effective over a period of time. He basically trains you to believe that he has the majority of the good luck being handed out by the billiard gods, and you have the majority of the bad luck. Continue reading

(H&S) Hustles & Sharks - Helpfulness

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Learn how to Beat the Sharks

It's nice to have good allies and advisors around you. These people can help improve your life and life style. But on the pool table, do NOT expect your opponent to be one of the individuals who have your best interests at heart. There are two reasons why an opponent would provide help and guidance. One, you are not a threat to his pocket book or self-esteem, or two, he wants to enfeeble your intentions to win. Continue reading

(H&S) Hustles & Sharks - Generation Gap

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Learn how to Beat the Sharks

This tactic is commonly used by older players (qualified AARP members) on younger shooters (20-somethings). They are fulfilling an obligation to the past and the future. When they were young, they were victims of the oldsters. Now that they have joined the gray hair league, it is their obligation to use those same tricks on today’s youth. Basically, what they suffered decades ago, they pass onto the next generation. Continue reading

(H&S) Hustles & Sharks - Table Critic Adviser

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Learn how to Beat the Sharks

This is another hustling trick that is common in most pool playing environments where the pool tables are not in excellent condition. It is commonly used against a player who is playing on the tables for the first time. The shooter might be a regular at another place but is checking out new places and players. Or he could be traveling and just happened to find this place. Of course, this does make you a new “victim” for the resident pool hustler. Continue reading

(H&S) Hustles & Sharks - Listening

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Learn how to Beat the Sharks

You would think that a key requirement of any sharking trick is to intrude on your thoughts. But this apparently innocent tactic is a destroyer of focus if you are the type of person who likes to inform others about your opinions and viewpoints. A knowledgeable gamesman, well trained in applied psychology, immediately recognizes your personality type and uses this very effective tactic. All he has to do is appear to be a genial fellow whose only purpose in life is to find you and become your confidant. His intent and purpose is to get you talking, a lot. Continue reading

(H&S) Hustles & Sharks - Odd Habits

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Learn how to Beat the Sharks

A good hustler can take this shark and become inventive. It is very effective when used in circumstances where there is almost no verbal communications between players. That limitation eliminates most of the sharks that require some sort of conversation. It’s hard to declare these as hustling attempts. And many of these might actually be habits, rather than a sharking effort. That doesn’t mean the effects (your reduced abilities to compete) don’t happen. Continue reading

(H&S) Hustles & Sharks - Invisible Friend

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Learn how to Beat the Sharks

When this psychological tactic is well-played, your first thought is to wonder if your opponent really might be insane. On second thought, you might consider whether he might live a more fulfilling life under 24/7 supervision. Finally you realize that if this was a serious problem, someone else would have handled the situation long before today. Continue reading

(H&S) Hustles & Sharks - Waiting to play

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Learn how to Beat the Sharks

These are a number of smaller tricks that a pool hustler can use against you, even while you are at the table and he is waiting to play. All he needs to do is set up a waiting area (usually down table) and perform little activities, seemingly unrelated to you. These little distractive activities are very common among amateur hustlers. Continue reading

(H&S) Hustles & Sharks - Self-inflicted Delusions

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Learn how to Beat the Sharks

This is one of the easiest sharks that a pool hustler can use against you – your own false ideology, constructed on a delusional belief in competency.

In competitions around the world, there are players who are intellectually dishonest about their skills and capabilities. This personal assumption is based on the player’s belief that his true skill level was established during the one competition in the past (recent or decades ago) when everything went right and all was successful. That was a glorious day when nothing went wrong.

Your assumption of a skill level and competence that cannot be factually proven is all the hustler needs to know. All he needs to do is encourage you to play beyond your abilities and basically hustle yourself into losing. If you suffer from this potential for over-estimation, then almost every game and match can not demonstrate that previous competence. All the hustler needs to do is observe the types of shots you attempt. If he observes that reality does not intrude upon your assumptions, he’s got an easy mark.

This is how you apply this self-imposed fantasy to your competitive efforts. Every loss is not your fault – but only the consequences of bad luck. This presumption of proficiency has become your basic assumption. And you can't understand why there is such a significant break between that fantasy and the reality of your current competitive skills.

With the true dedication of the slightly insane, you refuse to learn from experience. That past triumph is continuously held up as the truth, the whole truth, and nothing but the truth - actual demonstrable circumstances be damned.

The hustler loves players with these unrealistic expectations. All he needs to do is watch groups of players compete. He watches players (like yourself) miss a tough shot – and then moan and groan that it should have been easy. Mentally, he is already calculating how much he can take you for.

These false-expectations players actually believe many low percentage shots are within their skill level. They always have that rare winning experience quite vividly implanted into their brain. Any single unexpected success is claimed to be proof of his amazing skills.

So, whenever a shot attempt fails (no matter how simple, or complex), your friends and opponents must listen to you complain aloud or mutter vile deprecations under your breath. Statements like "Should have had that." and "Just once I'd like to play my regular game.", and "Damn. That was not a difficult shot." become your normal conversational contributions and the hustler to mark you for future slaughter.

Of course, not only are you living in a fool’s paradise, you are also telling every opponent exactly what types of shorts are difficult for you to make. You are letting everyone know that you have another weakness to be exploited. Any opponent who intelligently analyzes your abilities has just been handed a tool to easily win every match.

Response

One of the most basic realities of intelligent competition is this little bit of Shakespearean advice, "To thine own self be true." Basically, this says that you are much better off keeping your expectations based in reality.

If you can make tactical decisions on a frank appraisal of your chances for success, your chances of pocketing balls and moving the cue ball around the table for the next shot become much more realistic.

If reading this sharking trick awakens some awareness that you take lots of trips to fantasyland, you can throw some cold water on your imagination and make more intelligent playing decisions.

This is not to say that there are times when you really become a super competent shooter. When that happens, allow your brain and muscles to freely guide you to winning the match. But when you notice that edge becoming dull, immediately drop your level of expectations and pull yourself out of the fantasy and into the real world.